The ultracapacitorbased Maxwell Engine Start Module is a factoryinstalled option for new Kenworth T680s and T880s Kenworth

The ultracapacitor-based Maxwell Engine Start Module is a factory-installed option for new Kenworth T680s and T880s.

Kenworth charge start system now in production

Kenworth announced it has introduced into production advanced technology to enhance protection against battery drainage and a new inverter/charger option for easier battery recharging while parked.

The ultracapacitor-based Maxwell Engine Start Module (ESM) is a factory-installed option for new Kenworth T680s and T880s.

“The module provides dedicated power to start the truck and frees the truck’s standard batteries to focus on powering accessory devices, such as a laptop, microwave, refrigerator and television electronics, in addition to the truck’s electronics and lights,” according to Kenworth.

Kenworth added that the ESM is designed to start an engine in temperatures as low as minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit to a high of 149 degrees Fahrenheit, even when the batteries have low voltage.

“Kenworth customers can benefit from the Engine Start Module option, which is a cost-effective way to help reduce downtime and maintenance costs caused by low voltage,” said Kurt Swihart, marketing director. “The Engine Start Module has proven itself as a very capable solution for situations where starting reliability is critical.” Kenworth said its dealers offer ESM as an aftermarket solution, as well.

Also now in production is Kenworth’s new 1,800-watt inverter that provides the convenience of AC power in the sleeper. “Inverters are popular as they utilize AC power versus DC to help efficiently operate appliances, entertainment systems and other devices in the sleeper,” Swihart said. “That’s a benefit to drivers, plus the Kenworth inverter can operate more systems and devices with better performance in handling high-amp loads.”

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