Eaton clutch & transmission honored by DTNA

Eaton Corp. recently received two Master of Quality awards from Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA). The company was recognized for its outstanding performance in 2009 at its clutch and transmission operations in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, which is about midway between Mexico City and Monterrey

Eaton Corp. recently received two Master of Quality awards from Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA). The company was recognized for its outstanding performance in 2009 at its clutch and transmission operations in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, which is about midway between Mexico City and Monterrey. The facility manufactures Eaton’s complete line of medium- and heavy-duty clutches and manual and automated transmissions for all Class 6, 7 and 8 DTNA vehicles.

Carsten Kirchholtes, gm of procurement for DTNA, and Paul Romanaggi, gm of quality & supplier management for DTNA, noted, “Everyone’s efforts within your company toward meeting our demanding requirements and expectations are greatly appreciated by everyone at Daimler Trucks North America, as well as by our dealers and end-customers.”

“Daimler Trucks North America is widely recognized as one of the world’s foremost truck manufacturers,” said Tim Sinden, president of Eaton Truck Div. North America. “So it is very much an honor to have them acknowledge the hard work and dedication of our transmission and clutch teams. This award also reconfirms Eaton’s position as one of the industry’s top tier-one suppliers.”

Eaton’s Roadranger staff hit the road this spring to give fleets in all kinds of operations the opportunity to try their new, automated UltraShift Plus transmission. The new family of Eaton transmissions features new automated clutch technology and “intelligent shift selection” software that employs grade sensing, weight computation and driver throttle commands to make shift decisions intended to be safe and efficient.

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