Sterling, Freightliner taking orders for new diesel

Using the North American market to launch a new global engine platform, Sterling Trucks and Freightliner Trucks have begun taking orders for heavy-duty models powered by the 15-liter DD15 version of the new engine from Detroit Diesel

ORLANDO. Using the North American market to launch a new global engine platform, Sterling Trucks and Freightliner Trucks have begun taking orders for heavy-duty models powered by the 15-liter DD15 version of the new engine from Detroit Diesel.

Truck production with the new engine will begin March 1, with deliveries to customers in late April or early May, according to David Siler, Detroit Diesel director of marketing. Freightliner, Sterling and Detroit Diesel are all subsidiaries of Daimler Trucks North America LLC, which in turn is an operating company of Daimler AG, the world’s largest manufacturer of commercial vehicles.

Announcing the new engine availability here at the Technology and Maintenance Council (TMC) annual meeting, Sterling said the DD15 is initially being offered as an option in the set-back axle versions of its A-Line and L-Line models. Set-forward models of the company’s vocational and regional-haul trucks require a slight engine redesign to accommodate the oil pan and will not be available until the fourth quarter, according to Siler.

Detroit Diesel expects to be in full production of the smaller DD13 by the first quarter of 2009, and it will replace the current generation MBE4000 as the standard engine for Sterling heavy-duty models, Siler said. The MBE 4000 will be phased out of production by the end of 2009, as will the Series 60 diesel, which is also currently offered in Sterling and Freightliner models.

The new Daimler diesel uses exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) to meet U.S. ’07 diesel emissions standards. The DD15 also features turbo compounding, while the DD13 will, at least initially, use the more common variable vane turbocharging to accommodate power take-off (PTO) common to its vocational applications, according to Siler.

Siler also reinforced Daimler’s commitment to use selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to meet the upcoming 2010 U.S. emissions requirements. While at least two diesel engine builders have recently announced that they will not move to SCR for 2010, Siler told Fleet Owner, “We think SCR will give us a significant advantage because it will be both clean and more efficient.”

Siler also revealed that Detroit Diesel is planning a “stroked out” 16-liter version of its new diesel in 2010 that will product 630 hp and peak torque of 2050 lb.-ft.

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