November 4, 2014: Transportation on the ballot; Jacksonville is No. 1 for logistics; Pilot Flying J spending $100 million.

November 4, 2014: Transportation on the ballot; Jacksonville is No. 1 for logistics; Pilot Flying J spending $100 million.

Here is a look at what is happening in the world of transportation this morning:

Voters in Wisconsin and Georgia face big ballot decisions regarding transportation in today’s mid-term election, notes The Hill newspaper.

A magazine poll ranks Jacksonville, FL, as the top U.S. city for logistics infrastructure, according to the Jacksonville Business Journal.

Ocean shipping freight rates are expected to peak sometime in 2016, reports The Maritime Executive.

Video obtained by the Herald Sun shows DHL freight handlers being careless with parcel shipments.

Rhode Island’s Department of Transportation hopes a spate of recently acquired snow plow trucks will help it save money this winter, according to Providence Eyewitness News.

Demand for light trucks and SUVs resulted in strong automotive sales for October, Fox Business reports.

CSPnet.com notes that truck stop chain Pilot Flying J is “refreshing” its brand and investing over $100 million in its facilities.

Schneider National is on the hunt for truck drivers in Savannah, GA, according to WTOC 11.

The Globe and Mail covers the efforts of a Quebec trucking firm to switch its fleet to run on compressed natural gas.

Two men injured in a crash with a truck are suing for $1 million in damages, notes the Southeast Texas Record.

The BBC delves into a new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that calls for the “phase out” of petroleum and coal by 2100.

The Daily Mail highlights a study that finds a decade worth of shift work leads to impaired memory and thinking.

Economic growth estimates are being slashed for Europe again, according to Bloomberg.

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