Refuse fleet add 32 CNG trucks

Veolia ES Solid Waste, Inc., the solid waste division of Veolia Environmental Services North America (VESNA), announced the acquisition of 32 new compressed natural gas- (CNG) powered refuse collection trucks. The company has also opened a new CNG fueling station at its Fort Myers, FL, headquarters

America (VESNA), announced the acquisition of 32 new compressed natural gas- (CNG) powered refuse collection trucks. The company has also opened a new CNG fueling station at its Fort Myers, FL, headquarters.

With a refuse body built by McNeilus, the new trucks began serving residential and commercial customers across Lee County, Florida in October. The new Veolia-owned CNG fueling system utilizes time-fill fueling technology that allows drivers to fuel their trucks during overnight hours, minimizing administrative and operational downtime, according to the company. It was constructed by Vocational Energy, a general engineering contractor that specializes in CNG infrastructure construction for the waste industry.

“A CNG-powered fleet is a win-win for Veolia and for Lee County,” said Jim Long, president and CEO of Veolia ES Solid Waste. “As a domestic alternative energy solution, CNG is better for the environment and more efficient to operate than traditional diesel, so our customers can feel good knowing that their waste service provider is part of the environmental solution.”

In addition to a reduction in pollution, the company says the new trucks are approximately 15% quieter than trucks powered with diesel engines. The trucks will also come equipped with automated collection arms to increase efficiency and further reduce emissions and the number of hours they are in operation.

CNG technology is a key part of Veolia’s long-term sustainability strategy and the company says it intends to expand its CNG fleet into other markets in early 2011.

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