Propane pickup CARB-certified

Roush Enterprises has announced the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has approved the Roush propane-powered conversion of the F-150 Ford pickup

Roush Enterprises has announced the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has approved the Roush propane-powered conversion of the F-150 Ford pickup. According to the company, this is the first light-duty, propane-powered vehicle to receive On-Board Diagnostics II (OBD II) approval since CARB enacted substantially stricter guidelines in 2004 for light-duty vehicles operating on this alternative fuel.

The CARB approval means that Roush now has a green light to sell their propane-powered F-150 trucks in all 50 states. The CARB Executive Order (EO) for the ROUSH F-150 propane retail conversion kit, which will be valid for the 2007-1/2 and 2008 Ford F-150 pickup, is expected to follow shortly.

The company is also currently seeking CARB approval for their upcoming 2010 propane-powered F-250 and F-350 trucks. Power for both trucks will be based on the 5.4L, V-8 engine platform. Among the components changed in the conversion are the fuel tank with multi-valve fuel pump, stainless steel fuel lines, billet aluminum fuel rails, an upgraded custom Roush PCM calibration, and all necessary wiring, hardware and instructions. Future plans include converting Ford E-Series vans to run on propane as well.

“Getting CARB approval for a propane vehicle is no simple process with the stricter regulations that were put in place in 2004. The fact that the Roush propane-powered F-150 is the first light-duty vehicle to pass these regulations is a great source of pride to me and is witness to the skills of our engineering, calibration, and emissions teams at Roush,” said Jack Roush, chairman of Roush Enterprises & CEO/co-owner of Roush Fenway Racing.

Most propane used in the U.S. is produced domestically. Qualifying propane-powered vehicles are eligible for a variety of federal, state, and municipal tax credits or rebates as alternative-fuel vehicles.

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