Containers get high-tech security

Florida’s Port Everglades Terminal is the latest port facility looking to upgrade freight security, in this case by adopting General Electric’s CommerceGuard container security device (CSD) system.

Florida’s Port Everglades Terminal is the latest port facility looking to upgrade freight security, in this case by adopting General Electric’s CommerceGuard container security device (CSD) system.

Richard Rovirosa, CEO & gm of Port Everglades Terminal, said deploying a CSD system helps detect and report intrusion into a container, ensuring the safety of cargo as it travels from point of origin to final destination. He said that’s critical as Port Everglades handles more than 864,000 TEU (20-ft equivalent container units) annually and serves as a major cruise ship destination-- making it a high-traffic location of critical importance to the U.S. maritime economy.

GE’s CommerceGuard CSD is mounted inside a container as it is being loaded for shipment to monitor and report on potential en route tampering or damage, Rovirosa explained. While in transit, CSDs communicate securely with fixed and handheld readers. The readers then forward encrypted security and tracking information wirelessly via a global network that can be accessed only by authorized shippers, port authorities and other officials via the Internet. Automated warnings are also routed to appropriate authorities when warranted, Rovirosa added.

“This is a good example of an operator who believes employing technology such as CommerceGuard will play a key role in keeping our port, its workers and the local community safer,” said Phillip Allen, Port Everglades director. “By monitoring the container’s status and location as it progresses through the supply chain, it delivers accurate information about a container’s security status, its transportation history, and ultimately advance notification of potential threats.”

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