Splitting the rotor

New air-disc technology speeds rotor replacement Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems recently introduced some intriguing new technology for air disc brakes splined rotors that are deliberately prefractured. A development from the joint venture of Bendix and Knorr-Bremse, the splined disc design basically isolates the friction surface from the mating parts, preventing heat in the friction surface area

New air-disc technology speeds rotor replacement

Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems recently introduced some intriguing new technology for air disc brakes — splined rotors that are deliberately prefractured.

A development from the joint venture of Bendix and Knorr-Bremse, the “splined disc” design basically isolates the friction surface from the mating parts, preventing heat in the friction surface area from flowing elsewhere and causing rotor distortion.

The split-rotor technology allows an air disc brake rotor to be changed without removing the hub, wheel bearings, caliper and carrier from the wheel end. This reduces rotor replacement time from six hours down to about one hour.

To replace a rotor, a brake technician:

  • Replaces the brake's friction pads with wedges;

  • Actuates the foot brake pedal to apply brake pressure to wheel ends, cracking the rotor into two pieces;

  • Disconnects the two pieces from the adapter or hub by removing interconnecting pieces;

  • Installs a precracked replacement rotor onto the axle and bolts both pieces together with a conventional tool; and,

  • Unwinds the actuation pistons, inserts new friction pads, and adjusts for proper pad-to-rotor clearance.
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