Tighter driver screening

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has proposed rules that would make the screening of drivers stricter. Though current rules require new and prospective employers to investigate a driver's employment history going back three years, the proposed rule would require past and current employers to provide additional information within the mandated 30 days. FMCSA's proposal calls for

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has proposed rules that would make the screening of drivers stricter.

Though current rules require new and prospective employers to investigate a driver's employment history going back three years, the proposed rule would require past and current employers to provide additional information within the mandated 30 days.

FMCSA's proposal calls for employers to seek information verifying the driver worked for a said employer and the dates of employment, the driver's three-year alcohol and controlled substances history, and information indicating whether the driver failed to undertake or complete a rehabilitation referral prescribed by a substance abuse professional within the previous three years, but only if that information is recorded with the responding previous employer.

The agency also wants information indicating whether the driver illegally used alcohol or controlled substances after having completed a rehabilitation referral, and information indicating whether the driver was involved in any accidents as defined by federal regulations to be part of the screening.

The proposal also includes the right to review information provided by previous employers, the right to have errors in the information corrected by the employer who provided the information, and the right to have a rebuttal statement attached if the submitting information disputes the driver's claim that information is incorrect.

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