CARB rejects port truckers bid

After agreeing to a panel hearing, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has decided against a recommendation to delay the scheduled emissions upgrades for drayage trucks in the Port of Oakland

After agreeing to a panel hearing, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has decided against a recommendation to delay the scheduled emissions upgrades for drayage trucks in the Port of Oakland.

“We did not accomplish our intended outcome,” Ronald Light, executive director of the West State Alliance told Fleet Owner following the hearing. The hearing was designed to give truckers hauling in and out of the area port the opportunity to voice their concerns about the impact of the scheduled Phase II, emissions-related upgrades for drayage trucks that are currently mandated by CARB under the statewide drayage truck regulations which went into effect in 2007.

“We had hoped for additional political support, but environmental and pro-labor forces turned out en masse and really turned the tide against us,” Light said. “Now we are looking at possible legal remedies as well as exploring [a possible opportunity] to participate in a cooperative/collaborative remedy involving multiple stakeholders to raise money to help offset the impact on truckers. We are still calling on Sacramento, too. We are pursuing all options, going through all the doors we can.”

Since 2007, trucks with model year 1993 engines or older have been banned from California ports and trucks with 1994-2003 engines have had to be ungraded with particulate filters in order to keep operating at the ports. Under the next phase of the regulations, truckers operating Class 8 vehicles with 2004 model engines will also be required to reduce particulate emissions by 85% before Jan. 1, 2012, via the addition of an approved particulate filter. The following year, trucks with 2005-2006 engines will likewise have to be retrofit. Before 2014, all these vehicles will have to be fully compliant with 2007 EPA emissions standards or be replaced. According to Light, some 4,400 trucks will be affected by the Phase II requirements.

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