Ford sees sales, margins soaring by 2015

Ford Motor Co. expects to see its global vehicle sales increase some 50% by 2015, with cars – especially compact models – making up a larger share of its product portfolio by the end of the decade

Ford Motor Co. expects to see its global vehicle sales increase some 50% by 2015, with cars – especially compact models – making up a larger share of its product portfolio by the end of the decade.
In a presentation this week to financial analysts in New York city led by Alan Mulally, Ford president & CEO, the company projected its annual vehicle sales will top 8 million by mid-decade, up from 5.3 million in 2010.

What’s more, global automotive operating margins will increase by 8% to 9% from 6.1% over the same period. In North America, Ford believes its operating margin at mid-decade will land in the 8% to 10% range.

By 2020, Ford expects about 32% of vehicle sales to come from the Asia Pacific-Africa region – more than double its current percentage – while smaller vehicles should represent 55% of Ford's global vehicle sales, up from 48% today.

Mulally said that by 2014 more than 140% of Ford’s global product portfolio will be “new or significantly refreshed” compared with 2009. He added that continued focus will be put on global vehicles, including one midsize vehicle, one full-size commercial van and one global compact pickup, in addition to the global small vehicles Ford is already producing and selling today.

Also by mid-decade, Mulally said Ford expects that about 6 million of its global vehicle sales –some 75% of its total volume – will come from vehicles built on just five vehicle platforms: B, C, C/D, full-size commercial van and compact pickup.

At the same time, he said Ford will pursue profitable growth opportunities in emerging markets by creating lower-priced versions of global vehicles – offering a $1,000 to $2,000 cost reduction depending on vehicle size and systems.

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