‘Mud flap girl’ obscene? Perhaps in Montana

She’s an icon in trucking folklore. That nude silhouette of a woman carved in chrome that graces the mud flaps of many a big rig became the subject of controversy in the state of Montana where one resident went to local officials charging that a similar image etched on the back window of an SUV is obscene

She’s an icon in trucking folklore. That nude silhouette of a woman carved in chrome that graces the mud flaps of many a big rig became the subject of controversy in the state of Montana where one resident went to local officials charging that a similar image etched on the back window of an SUV is obscene.

According to an AOL News report. Shanna Weaver of Great Falls has a decal on the rear window of her SUV that depicts a woman’s silhouette above the word “SKIN.”

Her neighbor, Brian Smith, who parks across the street from Weaver’s SUV on a daily basis, charged that he should not be forced to endure looking at the figure that he considers to be sacrilegious.

“My upbringing dictates that the human body is a sacred thing, not something that should be put on display,” Smith told The Great Falls Tribune.

Weaver counters that her First Amendment rights make the sticker perfectly acceptable.

“It’s my freedom of speech, which he can’t take away,” Weaver told The Tribune. “It’s no different from the mud flaps that you see on trucks.”

The logo is from Skin Industries, a “Sports Fashion” company. The sticker is akin to the iconic “mud flap girl” silhouette that’s often seen adorning the flaps of tractor-trailers. Weaver’s decal has no shadowing but is more detailed than the mud flap girl.

Smith took his complaint the local police. The officer sent to investigate the dispute, however, determined that the sticker was not obscene and the dispute has never made it beyond a complaint with the Great Falls Police Department.
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