Detroit Diesel confirms 2002 Series 60 engine program

Detroit Diesel Co. CEO Lud Koci confirmed today that its 2002 Series 60 engines would available before federal emissions standards change in October. The first production versions of the low-emissions engine is scheduled to be available in September. "At the time we signed the consent decree in 1998, we were concerned that the time allowed to meet the new standards was minimal in comparison to normal

Detroit Diesel Co. CEO Lud Koci confirmed today that its 2002 Series 60 engines would available before federal emissions standards change in October. The first production versions of the low-emissions engine is scheduled to be available in September.

"At the time we signed the consent decree in 1998, we were concerned that the time allowed to meet the new standards was minimal in comparison to normal development and testing," Koci said. "But consistent with our initial commitment, we have met our objectives."

However, Koci added that the company still believes the industry would be well-served by a longer period of time for customers to test the new engines.

The 2002 Series 60 will use cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), which is the same technology chosen by almost all engine manufacturers worldwide to meet 2002 emissions levels. Cooled EGR adds some cost due to the additional hardware involved, Koci said. They will also carry a 2-4% fuel economy penalty.

On the positive side, John Morelli, vp – 2002 engine program, said Detroit Diesel was able to reduce the engine's weight, making it the lightest on the market.

"While the EGR cooler adds a few pounds, an enhanced gear train configuration allows for a reduced size gear case cover and next generation air compressor," Morelli said. "The air compressor is more efficient, requires less horsepower, and also saves weight."

In-use durability testing began on the engines last year. Since that time, six test vehicles have each run over 1,000 miles per day at 80,000 pounds caps. An additional test vehicle has been dedicated to cross country runs between company-owned assembly plants.

As previously announced, Detroit Diesel will initially make approximately 95% of its current ratings available in October 2002. As is its customary practice, Detroit Diesel will submit applications for 2002 emissions certification to the EPA approximately 30-60 days in advance of scheduled production, according to the company.

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