Electronic and photo IDs encouraged for freight security

Electronic ID systems for cargo and photo ID cards for truck drivers are just two security measures gaining greater scrutiny in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States. Jevic Transportation, an LTL subsidiary of Yellow Corp., has issued its drivers the Jevic Professional Driver Identification (Jevic PDI), to help increase security for both itself and its customers. The

Electronic ID systems for cargo and photo ID cards for truck drivers are just two security measures gaining greater scrutiny in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States. Jevic Transportation, an LTL subsidiary of Yellow Corp., has issued its drivers the Jevic Professional Driver Identification (Jevic PDI), to help increase security for both itself and its customers.

The Delanco, NJ-based carrier said its Jevic PDI includes a photo, driver identification number and other pertinent information to tighten security within its driver corps. Combined with the satellite tracking systems already in place in each of its trucks and thorough background checks, Jevic believes its ID system is an example of things to come for the trucking industry.

By using satellite tracking, the company is able to monitor each and every load and notify authorities if any tractor-trailer is diverted from its pre-planned route. The technology enables Jevic dispatchers to notify authorities at a moment's notice. In addition, there is a "panic button" built into the two-way communicator that is within reach of the driver's fingertips should the need arise to immediately signal for help.

“Jevic drivers have been using photo ID's since 1990 when we realized how much more that would assist our customers in securing their plants,” said Paul Karvois, Jevic’s president. “Now, we are adding another level of security by visibly displaying their photo ID to identify a Jevic driver at a glance.”

For cargo, border-crossing security may be intensified – and speeded up – by wider use of electronic freight ID systems, said Peter Luit, CEO of Livingston International, a trade service provider. He said the Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS), a program developed by Canada Customs and Revenue Agency, allows release information to be processed before goods arrive at the border. Luit said that about 55% of shipments entering Canada via his company use the pre-arrival release – noting that, overall, some 25% of all U.S. exports go to Canada.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish