LoJack Seeking HazMat Sales

After establishing itself in the automotive and construction equipment world, LoJack Corp. is now aiming to bring its wireless security and location services to the trucking industry via what it calls an “Anti-Terrorism Program.” It would offer discounted rates on its Stolen Vehicle Recovery Systems to fleets that haul hazardous materials. The program, announced at the National Cargo Security Council's

After establishing itself in the automotive and construction equipment world, LoJack Corp. is now aiming to bring its wireless security and location services to the trucking industry via what it calls an “Anti-Terrorism Program.” It would offer discounted rates on its Stolen Vehicle Recovery Systems to fleets that haul hazardous materials.

The program, announced at the National Cargo Security Council's 2004 Annual Conference in Las Vegas this week, was developed in response to the June 1 incident in Texas involving two propane tankers originally feared stolen for terrorist purposes, but later found in connection with ordinary cargo thieves.

The program is available immediately to hazardous materials companies or licensed carriers of hazardous materials (based on SIC code). The configuration would depend on the customer application and would cover 22 states coast-to-coast as well as the District of Columbia.

LoJack noted its system is radio-frequency-based, which means that its signals can be tracked whether the vehicle is on the open road, in a concrete garage, under dense foliage or in a steel container.

“This program may be one small piece of a much larger equation, but we believe the combination of our stolen vehicle recovery systems and [its] direct integration with law enforcement has the potential to help our country avert an unnecessary tragedy in the event hazardous trucks are ever targeted for terrorist activities,” said Joseph Abely, LoJack’s president & COO.

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