Movers support tighter CDL rules

The American Moving and Storage Assn., which represents household goods carriers, has voiced strong support for proposals that would tighten commercial driver’s license (CDL) requirements. Joseph M. Harrison, AMSA’s president, said moving companies support tighter CDL rules because they want the CDL to be a better indicator of a license holder's past driving record and competence to operate a commercial

The American Moving and Storage Assn., which represents household goods carriers, has voiced strong support for proposals that would tighten commercial driver’s license (CDL) requirements. Joseph M. Harrison, AMSA’s president, said moving companies support tighter CDL rules because they want the CDL to be a better indicator of a license holder's past driving record and competence to operate a commercial motor vehicle.

AMSA, based in Alexandria, VA, submitted comments the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) on October 25 in support of proposals FMCSA made in July to improve the accuracy of driving, citation and conviction information that a CDL contains, and of the state records supporting such a license.

The Department of Transportation, which oversees the FMCSA, was directed to implement the proposed revisions by the 1999 Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act. The Act responded to findings of a DOT report that found numerous vulnerabilities within the CDL program relative to licensing, reporting, and sanctioning of CDL holders.

Harrison said most fleet operators, including AMSA members, view a driver-applicant’s CDL as a mere starting point in determining whether the individual possesses the right qualities to take responsibility for a commercial motor vehicle and its load.

"AMSA’s members acknowledge the responsibility they shoulder of ensuring that they hire and contract with drivers who are competent and qualified to operate commercial motor vehicles on public highways," he added.

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