New Enhancements for Sterling Truck Corp. Models

Sterling Truck Corp. has introduced a variety of product enhancements and options for Sterling L-Line Class 7 and 8 vocational trucks. Sterling has made its air ride cab suspension standard equipment and added bumper options and a suspended pedal configuration. The company also announced that it has enhanced the electrical system for the Sterling A-Line of heavy-duty highway tractors as well as the

Sterling Truck Corp. has introduced a variety of product enhancements and options for Sterling L-Line Class 7 and 8 vocational trucks. Sterling has made its air ride cab suspension standard equipment and added bumper options and a suspended pedal configuration.

The company also announced that it has enhanced the electrical system for the Sterling A-Line of heavy-duty highway tractors as well as the L-Line. The new system makes it easier to customize a Sterling truck's wiring and add electrical functions.

Previously, air-ride for the cab was only an option for tractors in highway applications. Cab air ride suspension is standard now on straight trucks up to 98,000 pounds gross vehicle weight (GVW), and on all tractors up to 190,000 pounds gross combination weight (GCW).

The new bumper with center-pull capability features a heavy-duty steel crossmember behind the center section with a tow eye that protrudes through it. This allows a truck to be towed out of heavy mud without laddering or distorting the frame. It is available on tractors and trucks up to 190,000 pounds GCW.

The optional suspended pedal configuration arrangement suspends the accelerator, clutch and brake pedals from the firewall. In the standard configuration, the accelerator and clutch pedals are suspended, while the brake pedal is mounted on the floor. The pedals help prevent the accumulation of dirt and debris on the floor and around the pedals, addressing a common complaint among construction truck drivers.

The new wiring design allows more flexibility in making electrical connections between the chassis and the body. There are mow a minimum of six standard locations for body manufacturers to use when making power connections to the chassis, including access points under the hood, inside the cab and behind it.

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