Overnite strike over

Three years to the date after it started, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters' strike against Overnight Transportation has ended. Despite telling its members to return to work yesterday, the Teamsters are claiming victory over the Union Pacific subsidiary. Teamsters National Freight Director Phil Young said its members will "fight from within for the contract that they deserve. "These workers

Three years to the date after it started, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters' strike against Overnight Transportation has ended.

Despite telling its members to return to work yesterday, the Teamsters are claiming victory over the Union Pacific subsidiary. Teamsters National Freight Director Phil Young said its members will "fight from within for the contract that they deserve.

"These workers have stood strong throughout this entire struggle," Young said. "We will continue to stand with them in their efforts to achieve fair representation in the workplace."

The union said it ended the strike because of recent legal decisions that went in Overnite's favor.

"We are continuing the fight for justice for these workers," said Teamsters general president Jim Hoffa. "Our cause is right, our struggle is just, and ultimately, we will prevail."

Overnite president Leo Suggs said in a statement that taking care of employees "has allowed Overnite to thrive even as the Teamsters have tried to hurt this company and its people."

Overnite said only 296 workers out of its national work force of 13,000 remained on strike, though the union claimed 500 workers were honoring the picket line.

The strike did not hurt Overnite financially. Yesterday, it reported a 19% increase in third-quarter operating income of $25.6 million, compared to $21.5 million last year on a pro forma basis that included $3.2 million of operating income from Motor Cargo, which was acquired last November 30.

"Overnite made an impressive contribution to the quarter with its best overall quarterly performance since 1994," said Dick Davidson, chairman & CEO of Union Pacific.

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