Ports proceed with security projects

Ports across the United States are embarking on a variety of security projects, ones that could eventually affect how truckers pick up and deliver freight to port facilities. The Port of Houston Authority (PHA) is considering plans to participate in Smart and Secure Tradelanes (SST), an automated global cargo security network. SST uses automatic identification technologies, such as Radio Frequency

Ports across the United States are embarking on a variety of security projects, ones that could eventually affect how truckers pick up and deliver freight to port facilities.

The Port of Houston Authority (PHA) is considering plans to participate in Smart and Secure Tradelanes (SST), an automated global cargo security network. SST uses automatic identification technologies, such as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), satellite tracking systems, sensors, and biometrics, to provide real-time visibility on the location and security status of cargo containers and trucks.

Pending approval, PHA plans to develop an end-to-end container security system to track shipments from manufacturing, distribution and port facilities in Europe and Latin America to their destination at the Port of Houston and onward.

In Washington State, the Port of Tacoma and Port of Seattle have submitted 12 Operation Safe Commerce (OSC) projects to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to gain funding for new security techniques for container shipments.

The Ports of Tacoma and Seattle join the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and New York/New Jersey in working with private and public entities to identify supply chain weak spots and develop improved methods and technologies to ensure container cargo security.

Port of Seattle CEO M.R. Dinsmore said these OSC projects would play a crucial role in protecting the global economy, U.S. citizenry, marine facilities, and other cargo transport modes.

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