RegScan unveils hazmat software

Pennsylvania-based software developer RegScan Inc. has developed a software system to help protect America’s highways by monitoring hazardous-materials transportation shipments. The software, called HazMat Loader, was developed over the last year and is being used in Alabama and North Carolina as a key part of their hazmat enforcement programs. Statistics provided by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety

Pennsylvania-based software developer RegScan Inc. has developed a software system to help protect America’s highways by monitoring hazardous-materials transportation shipments.

The software, called HazMat Loader, was developed over the last year and is being used in Alabama and North Carolina as a key part of their hazmat enforcement programs.

Statistics provided by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (Commercial Vehicle Statistics 1999 – MCMIS Interstate and Intrastate Data) found that 49% of all hazmat inspections uncover safety violations. One-third of the violators are fined for improper placarding, a very serious violation that puts emergency response workers and the public at risk.

RegScan said HazMat Loader reduces public risk by telling government workers, drivers, dockworkers, carriers and shippers whether a load is or is not legal. The software is easy to use and only takes minutes to learn. In four simple steps, troopers and shippers can become hazmat placarding, marking, and segregation experts, said RegScan.

“The fact that [Alabama and North Carolina] have adopted HazMat Loader only four months after its launch is a clear indication of the power this software offers to improve public safety,” said Allen Ertel, RegScan’s founder, president and CEO.

Tom Balaban, VP and COO, added that the HazMat Loader software package now undergoing testing is due for release this month incorporates the over 140 pages of regulatory changes released June 21st by the U.S. DOT.

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