Wireless Truck IDs by March for West Coast Marine Terminals

Marine Terminal Operators on the West Coast have begun soliciting proposals from suppliers of a wireless identification system for the estimated 30,000 trucks that service the ports. Terminal operators anticipate having all necessary equipment installed on trucks and in terminals by March, 2004. Terminal operators have agreed to purchase and pay for installation of any equipment required on the trucks.

Marine Terminal Operators on the West Coast have begun soliciting proposals from suppliers of a wireless identification system for the estimated 30,000 trucks that service the ports. Terminal operators anticipate having all necessary equipment installed on trucks and in terminals by March, 2004.

Terminal operators have agreed to purchase and pay for installation of any equipment required on the trucks.

Doug Tilden, President and Chief Executive Officer of Oakland-based Marine Terminals Corporation (MTC), said, "Our company and other West Coast terminal operators believe this technology can be exceptionally effective when applied to the supply chain and, in particular, the management of trucks calling at marine terminals."

By immediately transmitting critical information as soon as trucks pull up to marine terminals, the wireless technology is expected to dramatically reduce the time required for trucks to pick up and drop off cargo at marine terminals. This will reduce emissions created by idling trucks, which has been an area of concern for communities near terminals.

The marine terminal operators are working with five groups to accomplish this project: various vendors through its published RFP, the U.S. Coast Guard, port and local government offices, trucking companies and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), under the most recent PMA/ILWU Contract's "Technology Framework."

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