Forecasting traffic

Forecasting traffic

LandSonar envisions that its capability to forecast traffic congestion, similar to that of weather predictions, will become a must-have feature for service providers that offer routing for trucking companies

LandSonar envisions that its capability to forecast traffic congestion, similar to that of weather predictions, will become a must-have feature for service providers that offer routing for trucking companies.

To that end, fleet management solutions provider GEOCOMtms has announced its integration of traffic speed forecasting capabilities with its route planning product, A.maze, for its customers dealing in local and short-haul pickup and delivery operations. The congestion forecasting capability was made available thanks to its licensing agreement to leverage LandSonar’s LPS (LandSonar Predictive Speed) tool.

LPS forecasts traffic speed on most roads in the continental United States. The goal of LPS is ultimately to predict traffic patterns using scientific models, similar to how weather is forecasted, according to a LandSonar spokesperson. LPS capabilities have already been integrated with map data providers Navteq and Tele Atlas. Traffic pattern and speed information at the road segment level are forecasted down to the time of day and day of the week through this partnership.

LandSonar has been collecting billions of open and proprietary historic GPS (global positioning system) and sensor observations to develop a “highly accurate” capability that could be leveraged to create “intelligent routing,” the company said.

“LPS is here, it’s accurate and offers full coverage throughout the entire continental U.S. on the roads fleets really drive on— not just arteries and highways,” Mark Sole, LandSonar director told FleetOwner. “And it’s open for routing solutions through products such as the Geocom solution.”

For more information, go to www.geocomtms.com or www.landsonar.com.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish