October 3, 2014: Technology critical to capacity; driver shortage growing more visible; new yeast could make biofuels cheaper

October 3, 2014: Technology critical to capacity; driver shortage growing more visible; new yeast could make biofuels cheaper

Here's a look at what's happening in the world of transportation this morning:

The Journal of Commerce reports on how technology may be a critical link to creating more “stable” and “driver-centric” trucking capacity.

U.S. economic growth is making the truck driver shortage more and more visible, according to The Globe and Mail newspaper.

Viral Global News reports on the development of a new kind of yeast that may vastly reduce the cost of making ethanol and other biofuels.

The spread of the AIDS disease in Africa is linked in part to the development of that continent’s transportation network, per National Geographic.

An article in USA Today indicates Ford may reintroduce a mid-size pickup to the U.S. market, though it won’t be the Ranger it discontinued three years ago.

The Columbus Dispatch reports on a funeral procession of heavy trucks conducted to honor a tow truck driver killed on the job.

Trucks are critical to keeping many California communities suffering from drought supplied with water, according to a Fox 40 TV news story.

City Lab publishes what it calls a “complete guide” to future U.S. freight movement patterns.

FEMA’s electronic logistics management system is deemed inadequate, according to FCW.com.

The Inquirer newspaper reports on an effort by New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D-Gloucester) to obtain $2 billion yearly for funding Garden State transportation projects.

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