Hill headed to FMCSA top spot

Hill headed to FMCSA top spot

President George W. Bush today announced his intention to nominate John H. Hill to be Administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

<i>John H. Hill</i>

President George W. Bush today announced his intention to nominate John H. Hill to be Administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Hill currently heads the agency as Acting Deputy Administrator and Chief Safety Officer.

Once officially nominated, Hill’s confirmation as Administrator must be approved by the Senate.

Yesterday U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta announced the selection of David H. Hugel for the position of FMCSA Deputy Administrator, effective May 30. Hugel will also serve as Acting Administrator, and under that role will head FMCSA until a new Administrator is confirmed, an FMCSA spokesperson told FleetOwner.

Recently the agency has traveled a tumultuous road as two of its top officials resigned within the past seven weeks. FMCSA Administrator Annette Sandberg left the agency on March 31, and Deputy Administrator Warren Hoemann resigned on May 13. Neither gave a reason for their departure.

See Sandberg resigns or FMCSA No. 2 resigns.

President Bush approved of Hill’s appointment as Chief Safety Officer in June 2003. Prior to his selection, Hill was a member of the Indiana State Police (ISP) from 1974-2003, where he served as the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division Commander from 1989 to 1994 and from 2000 to 2003. Hill commanded the ISP's Field Enforcement and Logistics Divisions since being appointed to the rank of Major in 1988.

Hugle will join FMCSA after serving the past three years as the Administrator for the Maryland Division of Motor Vehicles. Hugle’s career focused on motor vehicle issues for the past 19 years in both the public and private sectors.

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