Garden State gets tough on idling

July 8, 2004
Truck and bus operators in New Jersey are being warned to restrict idling to three minutes or less-- or risk paying fines that will start at $200 per day, according to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The agency recently announced plans to step up enforcement of existing idling regulations that restrict diesel-powered vehicles from idling for more than three consecutive

Truck and bus operators in New Jersey are being warned to restrict idling to three minutes or less-- or risk paying fines that will start at $200 per day, according to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

The agency recently announced plans to step up enforcement of existing idling regulations that restrict diesel-powered vehicles from idling for more than three consecutive minutes if the vehicle is not in motion.

Vehicles at the operator’s place of business (i.e., the home terminal or base) are required to limit idling to less than 30 minutes. Vehicles not located at the operator’s home base may idle for up to 15 minutes, if the engine has been shut down for three or more hours prior to the idling period.

According to DEP, inspectors will target retail centers, truck yards, warehouse distribution centers, loading/unloading areas, bus staging areas, convenience stores and public entertainment venues in their statewide effort to curb idling. New Jersey residents can also call a 24-hour toll-free number to report suspected violations.

To learn more about the requirements, can contact DEP’s Diesel Risk Reduction Team at 609-633-2306. Complaints or comments can be registered by calling the appropriate DEP field office: Northern Field Office, 973-299-7700; Metro Field Office, 973-669-3935; Central Field Office: 609-584-4100; Southern Field Office, 856-614-3601.

About the Author

Wendy Leavitt

Wendy Leavitt joined Fleet Owner in 1998 after serving as editor-in-chief of Trucking Technology magazine for four years.

She began her career in the trucking industry at Kenworth Truck Company in Kirkland, WA where she spent 16 years—the first five years as safety and compliance manager in the engineering department and more than a decade as the company’s manager of advertising and public relations. She has also worked as a book editor, guided authors through the self-publishing process and operated her own marketing and public relations business.

Wendy has a Masters Degree in English and Art History from Western Washington University, where, as a graduate student, she also taught writing.  

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of FleetOwner, create an account today!

Sponsored Recommendations

Report: The 2024 State of Heavy-Duty Repair

From capitalizing on the latest revenue trends to implementing strategic financial planning—this report serves as a roadmap for navigating the challenges and opportunities of ...

Fleet Industry Benchmarks: How does your fleet stack up?

Discover how your fleet compares to industry benchmarks and gain insights from a 2024 Benchmarking Report on maintenance spend, turnaround time, and more. Join us to identify ...

Build a Tolling Program to Manage Toll Fees and Risks

Fleets looking to effectively manage their operational costs should consider their tolling costs. Download the PrePass whitepaper, “Build a Tolling Program to Manage Toll Fees...

Reducing CSA Violations & Increasing Safety With Advanced Trailer Telematics

Keep the roads safer with advanced trailer telematics. In this whitepaper, see how you can gain insights that lead to increased safety and reduced roadside incidents—keeping drivers...