Detroit Diesel unveils 2002 compliant engines

Sept. 18, 2001
Detroit Diesel Corp. (DDC), a subsidiary of DaimlerChrysler, says it is ready to provide a full line of ratings for its 2002-compliant Series 60 engine. DDC said it expects approximately 95% of all current ratings will be available by October 1, 2002, deadline. “We have progressed significantly with the 2002 Series 60 engine development process,” said John Morelli, vp in charge of the 2002 Engine
Detroit Diesel Corp. (DDC), a subsidiary of DaimlerChrysler, says it is ready to provide a full line of ratings for its 2002-compliant Series 60 engine. DDC said it expects approximately 95% of all current ratings will be available by October 1, 2002, deadline.

“We have progressed significantly with the 2002 Series 60 engine development process,” said John Morelli, vp in charge of the 2002 Engine Program for DDC. “The standard maximum engine speed will remain at 2100 rpm and, depending on rating and application, the fuel economy of 2002 Series 60 engines is now in a range of 2 to 4% less than current engines.”

Morelli said DDC still has a year of development time in front of them, and its goal is to continue improving fuel economy until any difference compared to current ratings is insignificant.

“Soot loading of the lube oil, once considered by some to be a potential problem, is in line with current production engines,” he said. “We had to do a lot of work to get where we are, and we remain committed to do even more work to make sure the Series 60 engine keeps all the advantages that has made it number one.”

The overhead camshaft design of the Series 60 engine allows for the high injection pressure needed to meet the new standards. When higher injection pressure is combined with exhaust gas recirculation and advanced turbocharger technology, the result is a low emissions engine with excellent performance.

DDC is using an Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system combined with a redesigned turbocharger to meet 2002 emission requirements. DDC said its 2002 engines have been in use for more than a year ago in the stop-and-go transit bus market and it expects some 3,500 of those engines will be running throughout the U.S. and Canada by October of next year.

About the Author

Sean Kilcarr | Editor in Chief

Sean previously reported and commented on trends affecting the many different strata of the trucking industry. Also be sure to visit Sean's blog Trucks at Work where he offers analysis on a variety of different topics inside the trucking industry.

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of FleetOwner, create an account today!

Sponsored Recommendations

Report: The 2024 State of Heavy-Duty Repair

From capitalizing on the latest revenue trends to implementing strategic financial planning—this report serves as a roadmap for navigating the challenges and opportunities of ...

Fleet Industry Benchmarks: How does your fleet stack up?

Discover how your fleet compares to industry benchmarks and gain insights from a 2024 Benchmarking Report on maintenance spend, turnaround time, and more. Join us to identify ...

Build a Tolling Program to Manage Toll Fees and Risks

Fleets looking to effectively manage their operational costs should consider their tolling costs. Download the PrePass whitepaper, “Build a Tolling Program to Manage Toll Fees...

Reducing CSA Violations & Increasing Safety With Advanced Trailer Telematics

Keep the roads safer with advanced trailer telematics. In this whitepaper, see how you can gain insights that lead to increased safety and reduced roadside incidents—keeping drivers...