Voting time

Nov. 5, 2007
"Voting is one of the few things where boycotting in protest clearly makes the problem worse rather than better." --Jane Auer, novelist and playwright, who wrote under the name Jane Bowles. You really can't beat Jane Auer's words when we talk about ...

"Voting is one of the few things where boycotting in protest clearly makes the problem worse rather than better." --Jane Auer, novelist and playwright, who wrote under the name Jane Bowles.

You really can't beat Jane Auer's words when we talk about why voting matters -- something much of our country will be doing tomorrow. You've got to get out there and vote ... period. For those of you who say your vote doesn't matter, need I remind you that the last two presidential elections were decided by less than 100,000 votes -- the equivalent of one county. In short, your vote DOES matter, it DOES count, and you DO decide who governs us all ... even if you do NOT vote, for even by sitting on the sidelines you change the election dynamic.

You'll hear all the usual stories tomorrow as well, from about how less than 40% of the general population votes to how some disreputible campaigns pay people NOT to vote, trying to supress demographics that migh tfavor their candidate's opponent. Listen, ignore all that -- go and vote. It's free, it's what makes our society work, and it doesn't take too much of your time.

If you're a driver and can't get home in time, you should have voted by absentee ballot. For those drivers that say it takes too much time to do so, I remind you of this: there are three MILLION commerical driver license holders in this country, a rather sizable population. If drivers as a group rally around a candidate or two, you very well may change election dynamics. And find that politicians might start listening to your concerns and needs for once.

If you are an executive, you should find ways to make it easy for everyone in the company to vote: help drivers get absentee ballots, make sure people's work schedules can be modified so they can go to the polls in the morning, afternoon, at night, whenever. And lead by example -- encourage them to vote, but try to leave your personal leanings out of it. My parish priest encouraged the whole congregation to vote last weekend ... and did not breathe one word of the Catholic Church's position on any of the issues. He simply said it's our duty and moral obligation to vote as a way to improve the common good -- that's all. You can do the same: and I'll bet your workers will take a whole new view of you as a person by doing so.

About the Author

Sean Kilcarr 1 | Senior Editor

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